Learning to Infer Demographic Data

Posted by admin | Posted in Branding | Posted on 15-02-2010

I haven’t posted anything in awhile because I have been really busy and haven’t felt too inspired to share anything.  However, I was sharing this story with someone the other week and thought it might be something other people would find useful. The actual campaign is also no longer relevant so I feel ok to share it.

A year ago, almost to the week, I was just starting to run this display campaign for Stretch Mark cream.  As I used to do, the first thing I did was put up a Google content campaign related to stretch marks.  Pretty much right off the bat it was doing a few hundred sales a day, so I knew the campaign had a lot of potential.  A few days after the campaign launched I started digging into the stats only to see I was getting a lot of sales from articles talking about the news of Chris Brown beating Rhianna (I am really not kidding).

At first I laughed and thought it was odd, but then I thought there had to be a reason this was happening.  After looking through all the articles related to the incident, most we’re coming from Hip-hop sites that I was not actively targeting.  The majority of the people reading these sites were African Americans.  I had never thought previously about actively targeting black women for this campaign, but it seemed like it could work.

Taking the idea of targeting Black Women specifically because of my referral data, I created a quick content campaign that was full of placements geared toward black women.  I found a lot of sites that I didn’t know about (which is always great) and realized that many of them were a lot larger than I realized.  After the first day or so it stood out that Black Planet could be a huge source for this campaign.  Taking my Google content campaign data, I called Black Planet and signed an IO to target women ~25 and over (I don’t quite remember) and it did very well.

Point of the story is that if you pay attention to your traffic and really look for patterns, you can learn to infer demographic data about your sales patterns without forcing customers to give the data to you.  As you’re scaling campaigns, look for patterns and ways your can use those patterns to scale the campaign even further.

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Big Thanks to Azoogle

Posted by admin | Posted in Internet, Life, Marketing | Posted on 27-10-2009

Sorry for the lack of blog posts recently, but I haven’t had anything I felt inspired to write about, and I’ve been working/traveling a lot.  Anyway, I wanted to give a big thank you to Azoogle, particularly Maggie and Mitch.  Azoogle was the very first Affiliate network I joined and they have taken care of me since day 1.  They have gone above and beyond what most networks do for their affiliates.  They’ve flew me to NYC for my Birthday, flew to see me and took me to a Hurricanes NHL playoff game, they sent me to the Playboy Mansion, not mention countless gifts/dinners/parties.  Basically, you’re stupid if you’re not working with Azoogle.

Just recently I moved to a new condo and when I told my AM at Azoogle (hi Maggie), she decided to send me some house warming presents.  Azoogle was kind enough to send me an LG Blu-ray player and an Epson 6100 projector for my new “movie theater”.  I made a little video below:

If you’re not working with them you should, they’ve never once failed to meet my expectations.  Heck, when I was in France my AM called me at 1am her time, 7am my time, to update me on an offer for on a media buy I was launching.

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Dominating a Traffic Source

Posted by admin | Posted in Internet, Marketing | Posted on 16-08-2009

This post may seem completely obvious but few people can successfully implement it.  As I progress in my marketing career one of the things I become most protective over and work on the most are my traffic sources.  Even if someone copies your landing page and sells the same products as you, without a traffic source they have no sales.  This is why I worry more about being protective and territorial over traffic sources than I do landing pages and offers.

After you find traffic sources that work for your campaign, your goal should be to minimize competition and maximize exposure.  You want to find ways to keep your competitive out and scale your campaign to get maximum volume.  Here are some trips/techniques to start dominating your traffic sources

  • Make multiple accounts.  On some self serve ad networks you can make multiple accounts and run your ads simultaneously, forcing out competition
  • Out bid your competition.  If your ROI is very high, start bidding a little higher to get more volume and force competitors out
  • Prebuy the adspace.  If you are buying reserved inventory and it is working out, start locking it down by purchasing more and more of it for future days.  I already have ad space purchased for June 2010.
  • Ask for exclusivity.  When you find a place that works, say you will pay more, more frequently, or prepay if they don’t allow anyone else to advertise what you’re advertising with them

I always contend it is better to dominate one/a few traffic sources than run a little bit on every source you can find.  Play around with some ad platforms, get good at them, choose the ones you like, and then figure out the tricks to dominate them.  There are so many places to purchase ads right now, it is a matter of find what works for you and scaling.

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Work Smarter, Not Longer Hours

Posted by admin | Posted in ASW, Internet, Life, Marketing | Posted on 02-08-2009

This post can be applied to lots of different jobs and lifestyles, but it is mainly aimed at affiliates and business owners.

When I left my corporate job last year (6 days away from being 1 year to the day, not that I’m counting :) ), I did it for 3 reasons:

  1. To Make significantly more money
  2. To be my own boss and not deal with a corporate hierarchy/BS
  3. To work less and on my own schedule

At this point in my life I have accomplished all 3 goals, but that wasn’t always the case.  When I first started, it took awhile to learn to make more money and in order to do it I was working longer hours, and at the time I was ok with that.  But as I learned more and my business grew, I learned how to work smarter and not work longer.  January 2009, right after Affiliate Summit West, is when I started doing this, and my earnings have increased dramatically every month since.

My old schedule consisted of me getting up around 9am, working all day, eating dinner and then working until 2-3am, sometimes longer.  My days of doing that are gone, in terms of affiliate marketing.  My current schedule is usually to wake up around 10-10:30am, get to the office in time to go to lunch and I am out by 6, and I do 1-2hrs of work outside of this office, tops.

The reason my schedule has changed so much and my earnings have gone up is because I started focusing on the most important/high volume tasks and less on every task that will make me money.  For instance:

  • I’ve pretty much stopped doing SEO for affiliate sites. It takes up too much time that I could be spending on media buying or not working at all.  When in reality, the money you can make from SEO is peanuts compared to high volume media buying.  I don’t mean to piss of SEO people or say SEO isn’t a valuable/important task, because it is, I just choose no longer to focus on it given my current business model.
  • I stopped running every offer.  I used to run 4-6 verticals at a time, now I focus on 1-2 and make them large.  Once I started doing this (I was a 1 man operation) I was able to scale my verticals much bigger than when I was trying to focus on tons of campaigns.  I contend it is better to be one of the top players in a niche instead of being a small to mid-size player in several. But to each their own.
  • I started focusing on traffic sources that required less oversight/daily optimizations and could yield much higher sales volumes.  I decided that I would stop spending countless hours optimizing keywords in PPC campaigns or blocking sites in content campaigns, and I would focus on spending money with large ad networks where less attention was needed.  Yes I know I am leaving some money on the table, but I am ok with that.  I don’t have to earn every available dollar.
  • I realized that you don’t win an award for working longer hours than the next guy.  No one gives a shit about your tweets that let the world know you’re working an all nighter, no one cares.  So why work long hours if you don’t have to?  Learn how to beat your competition through being smarter instead of working around the clock.
  • I stopped doing so much competitive intelligence.  I used to make it my job of knowing who was running what offer, where they were running it, etc.  When I started focusing on my stuff more, I started to better.

These are just a few things that I started doing that have helped me to work less and earn more, allowing me to live the lifestyle that I ultimately wanted.  What are some things you do?

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Financial Tips for Affiliates

Posted by admin | Posted in Branding | Posted on 18-07-2009

I posted this info several months ago in a thread on WickedFire, but I forgot to post it on my blog.  In case you missed it before, here are a few tips that have really helped me over the last year to grow and manage my business.  As affiliates, we often times only look at campaigns and offers, but there are many more aspects that we need to be involved in when we view our affiliate businesses as traditional businesses.

  • Get a CPA, don’t be cheap. You get what you pay for and a good one will pay for it’s self very quickly.
  • Stop using a debit card immediately. Get a good credit card, I use the Amex Plum that has 2% cash back. After a little history with them you can usually charge about 200-300k before they make you pay it down. This gives me a lot of float and protection you don’t get with a debit card. When you start doing bigger numbers, the cash back with this card can be more than enough to live off of each month.
  • I have tried to stop using a regular checking account and move to brokerage account for all my banking. I use Schwab, but others are good too. I do all my banking straight out of my tax free municipal bonds sweep account. I earn interest on my savings not to mention since i am doing all my checking from this, I earn money off my weekly wires until it is time to pay off the credit card. Many credit cards end up having a float period of 35-60 days. That can be a lot of tax free interest money
  • Stop paying wire fees at your bank. Schwab has no wires and most banks don’t either if you keep enough cash in the bank. Bank of America doesn’t charge wire fees on their preferred business checking with only requires a avg monthly balance of 25k. Wire fees can add up, stop paying for them.
  • Negotiate your media buys. Almost any rate can be negotiated. I’ve gotten as much as 50% rates by prepaying or signing a larger IO. Say you’ll do 100k if they give you break. Get a 48hr out clause, if the traffic sucks, bail. If it doesn’t, you got a cheap rate.
  • Ask Google for credits. I can usually get refunds of $500/m by submitting click fraud info too Google and they will almost always credit me. They do click adjustments, but it doesn’t always catch everything. Audit your traffic and email their quality people if you find lots hits from multiple ip’s or a small block of IPs
  • Find short terms investment options. There are some short term bonds, cd’s, etc… that you can put cash in before you need to pay your credit card. Lets say you have a card that the billing cycle is 30 days and they give you 30 days to pay, that’s a 60 day float. You could invest some or most of your advertising costs into a short term CD before you need to pay off your credit card.
  • Don’t try and be a baller, save your money. Bank hard now, save, and then live the rest of your life off the interest your savings earns. This means that you should try and live below your means.  It’s ok to reward yourself, just don’t do it all the time and don’t do it when you can’t afford to.

Just a few things that might help you save or make more with the money you have.  Anyone else have other tips that have helped them?

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The Inside Scoop on Revolution202

Posted by admin | Posted in Branding | Posted on 07-07-2009

If you’ve been in the affiliate industry in the last year or more, you know about the Tracking202 team.  Whether you are using their tracking202 platform, the self-hosted prosper202 (like I am), or even their various world proxies, almost everyone in the affiliate game is using one of their services.

In the last couple of days they announced the newest addition to their line of services, the Revolution202 Affiliate Network.  While I generally think that the last thing the Affiliate Industry needs is a new network, they actually managed to create a new network that brings offers and services that other networks don’t have.  Stephen Truong, one of the co-founders was nice enough to chat with me yesterday on the phone about their new network and to approve my application.  After talking with him for a bit, these are a few major highlights and services that will be offered with Revolution202:

  • They will not be brokering out their offers and taking brokered offers
  • Will have both CPA and CPS offers available
  • Free coupons to Google, Myspace, Facebook etc for their affiliates
  • Instant qualification for Yahoo Gold
  • Custom transparent back end that will allow affiliates to see their lead quality, charge backs, cancellations, etc. on the offers that they are running
  • They will also be offering their paid services like tracking202 Pro and the future full release of Stats202 for free to their affiliates who push volume
  • Not to mention a few extras I can’t talk about yet

Like I said, I’ve already signed up with Revolution202, and you should too.  There are definitely some big things coming their way.  Not to mention, if it wasn’t for their services like Prosper202, there is no way I would have been successful as I have been with my campaign.  I think most anyone who uses it could agree as well.

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Podcast with Andrew Wee

Posted by admin | Posted in Internet, Life, Marketing | Posted on 24-06-2009

A couple days ago I did a podcast interview with Andrew Wee for his blog.  It is fairly long, like 45 minutes, but it goes over how I got my start, what I did before AM, how I work on campaigns, platforms I use, compliance, etc.  Hopefully someone will find it useful.

You can listen to the interview here.

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Monetizing International Traffic

Posted by admin | Posted in Internet, Marketing | Posted on 16-06-2009

I had a friend tell me not to post this because it was “too useful”, but I figured I would post it anyway.  Everyone needs a useful tip every now and then right?

One thing that most affiliates don’t do is manage the country redirects to offers on their side.  They rely on the network to redirect the traffic or they create seperate pages for different countries.  While this is an ok solution, it isn’t the best.  Often times people will be traveling abroad and want to buy, but are sent to the wrong offer because if their IP address.  Or sometimes affiliates aren’t monetizing international traffic at all.

Here is what I do to monetize international traffic:

I downloaded an geoip script from here off GeoPlugin.com.  I unzipped the script into a folder called “geo”.  This file will basically capture the users IP address and cross reference it to a database to determine what country they are then.

After this is done, I setup my redirects for the affiliate offers.  So your redirects would now look like:

<?php
// ccr.php - country code redirect
require_once(’/geo/geoplugin.class.php’);
$geoplugin = new geoPlugin();
$geoplugin->locate();
$country_code = $geoplugin->countryCode;

switch($country_code) {
case ‘US’:
header(’Location: http://www.yourdomain.com/usoffer.php’);
exit;
case ‘CA’:
header(’Location: http://www.yourdomain.com/caoffer.php’);
exit;
case ‘GB’:
header(’Location: http://www.yourdomain.com/gboffer.php’);
exit;
case ‘IE’:
header(’Location: http://www.yourdomain.com/irelandoffer.php’);
exit;
case ‘AU’:
header(’Location: http://www.yourdomain.com/australiaoffer.php’);
exit;
case ‘NZ’:
header(’Location: http://www.yourdomain.com/newzealandoffer.php’);
exit;
default: // exceptions
header(’Location: http://www.yourdomain.com/allelseoffer.php’);
exit;
}

?>

Basically what this redirect does is check the users IP, determines their country, then sends them to the appropriate redirect based on where you specified people from their country to go to.  By doing this, I can control which offer people from which country go to.  So if a top converting offer only takes US traffic, then I send the US people to that offer, then find the best CA offer and send CA traffic to it, and so on.  As you can see in the script, I identify specific countries which I receive the most traffic from, then I use a final “catch all” redirect which I send users to if an offer accepts “any country”.

By using a method like this, you will prevent more broken links when a user can’t access an offer, you have more control over where users go, you will effectively monetize more users, and make more money.  Hope this helps.

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Optimizing Google Content Campaigns

Posted by admin | Posted in Internet, Marketing, PPC, search engines | Posted on 19-05-2009

It’s been awhile since I posted something useful, so I thought I would post how I run/optimize my Google Content campaigns.  Personally, I love Google Content, I would run it almost always over Search, if I had to choose.  I haven’t been running it recently, just because I have been focusing on media buys.  However, Google Content is a great source for traffic, usually cheap, when you can get it.

There are 2 kinds of Google Content campaigns, keywords and placements.  This post will focus soley on keyword campaigns.

Campaign Structure

As an example, I will use “Golf Clubs” as the product I am promoting.  I start by creating a content campaign, with search turned off, and choose 1 country.  I like to make countries their own campaigns for tracking purposes.  I make an initial ad group with 50-75 keywords around a loosely related topic like “golf clubs”.  Then I write 2-3 text ads and upload 2 image ad variations in the standard ad sizes.  If you are using tracking/propser 202 make sure to use the {keyword} variable at the end of your URLs.  After this ad group is done, I’d make another ad group for Putters and repeat the ad types.

Bidding

I normally bid very high initially.  This way I am getting impressions, clicks, and developing a history.  After a few days your CPCs will start to fall and you can continue to make optimizations.

Focus on CTR

Your ad CTR is pretty much the biggest factor on what your CPC’s will be.  You need to work on getting your ad CTR as high as possible.  This means writing good, original text ads and making quality image ads.  If you copy everyone’s text/image ads, your CTR will be low or eventually fall off.  You also need to block low CTR sites, which we will get into in a minute.

Landing Page Tweaks

In terms of landing page optimizations for Google Content, you need to have original text or you will get slapped quickly, I try not to use Wordpress for Google Content as I find I usually get slapped faster, but this isn’t always the case for everyone.  In the footer you should have links for the Sitemap, About, Terms, Privacy, and articles pages.  I usually build back links to the site as well before I launch the campaign.  I find if I treat the site like I am going to “SEO it”, it performs much better in Google Content.

Eliminate Underperforming Keywords and Sites

This is the biggest thing for making a campaign successful.  I usually try to let a campaign run for 3-5 days before I start making tweaks.  After about 5 days I start to elimate keywords that aren’t doing well, as well as blocking sites that are performing poorly.  If you use tracking/prosper202 and out the {keyword} variable in your destination URL, then you should be able to track performance of your content keywords.  If you have a keyword that is flat out tanking, eliminate it.  Then run a placement report so it shows by domain, then sort by CTR and elimate all the domains with low CTR.  You are effectively raising your CTR by doing this which will lower your CPC’s and raise your quality score.  I usually eliminate anything under .1% unless it is converting very well.  Also, if you have placements that are not converting well, eliminate them too at this time.

I almost always start my campaigns by blocking sites like gmail.com, myspace.com, and ezinearticles.com.  They tend to really bring you down.  Once you start eliminating sites, you will see a nice drop in CPCs.  I usually end up with several hundred blocked domains in a campaign after a few weeks.

All in all, that is pretty much what I do for content campaigns.  I find the content network to be pretty easy to run/optimize if I am not getting slapped around.

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Learning To Take Risks

Posted by admin | Posted in Internet, Life, Marketing | Posted on 30-04-2009

This may sound simple and it is, but it seems to me that learning how and when to take risks is the biggest separator between unsuccessful and successful people.  Very few people are successful in life that don’t take risks.  Me personally, I am naturally risk averse when it comes to money/business.  I don’t always play it safe, but I am rarely the one that goes for the home run.  I have found this to be good and bad.

After going to Ad Tech in San Francisco, I realized that the biggest difference between myself and the affiliates that are larger than me, is not that they know more or have access to information I don’t have, it is that at some point they took some big risks.  Now I am not an advocate of taking risks that don’t make sense, but there are times when they do make sense.  Whether it is doing a very large media buy, doing a homepage takeover, starting your own product, or taking heavy losses on a PPC campaign to break into a market, there are times when you have to take risks.  Assuming your risks make sense, the rewards can be huge.

In regards to affiliate marketing, you can’t just immediately take risks when you start.  You need to learn the ropes, save a little cash, get a feel for what works, then you can take some risks.  There comes a point in time when in order to reach the next level, to be the best, you have to start signing insertion orders for $1M, $2M, or more.  Right now in affiliate marketing, unless you’re doing mid to high six figures a day, you’re really not one of the biggest players.  The way these guys do it is by taking risks and spending a BUTTLOAD of money each day on ads.

So if you want to be average or middle of the road then it’s fine to play it safe, but if you want to be the best or in the top tier, you eventually have to start going for the home runs and hope they work out.

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Tips on Media Buying

Posted by admin | Posted in Internet, Marketing | Posted on 25-04-2009

I am going to preface this post by saying 2 things.  I’ve had good success doing small and mid 6 figure buys, but I’m not the best at media buying.  Secondly, when I say media buys, I mean purchasing ad space through a network or large site, on a CPM (cost per thousand impressions) or dCPM (dynamic cpm) basis.  I do not consider Facebook, Adsonar, Adsdaq, Pulse360, etc. to be media buying for this post.

After having spent a lot of money doing media buys, i’ve learned a few things:

  • Rates are almost always negotiable.  Either sign a larger IO or offer to prepay and you will almost always get a lower rate.  Lower CPM pricing can make or break a media buy
  • Just cause you see someone’s ad in a media buy doesn’t mean it is profitable.  I make this mistake often.  There are lots of variables as to whether you can make it profitable such as their CPM cost, their payout, but also they could also be running negative.
  • Know you’re target market before you do a media buy.  You should know your target demographics before you contact the network/site.  Don’t rely on your rep to tell you what ages to target, often they just want to make the sale.
  • Test the offer on Facebook first.  I have found running an offer on Facebook first gives me a great idea if the landing page is good and what ages to target.  Better to learn this info on Facebook than during a 6 figure buy.
  • Make sure you know when you’re out clause is.  Ask upfront before you sign the IO, you never want to get stuck in a bad buy you can’t get out of.
  • I’ve never had success with Right Media.  I have found on multiple buys that the traffic quality on Right Media is bad.  I would just stay away from it.  Yahoo properties and their Comscore 250 are a different story, but smaller right media sites tend to be bad.
  • Don’t expect every buy to have ridiculous ROI or be wildly successful.  My first buy tanked.  My second buy tanked (lost like 25k), my 3rd buy rocked (like 400% roi), but every other one has usually been modest 10-25% roi.  When doing big media buys, you usually have smaller margins and make up for them with volume (there are exceptions to this obviously).
  • Do not sign an IO if you don’t feel comfortable with it.  Trust your instincts, typically you will know more about your offer/landing page than your ad sales rep.  If you don’t like the targeting, make them change it.  If you really think the CPM price is too high, don’t sign it.  Bottom line is don’t let someone badger you into signing an IO if you don’t want to.  It will rarely ever work out in your benefit.

That’s just a couple of tips for media buying that i’ve learned from successes and failures.  Also, don’t think you have to do media buys to be big.  I know really big affiliates who never do media buys, but I also know guys who almost only do media buys.  There are tons of traffic sources out there, some will work for you, some won’t.

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How to Strip Prosper/Tracking202 Info From URL

Posted by admin | Posted in Branding | Posted on 15-04-2009

I read this somewhere a while a back, but I don’t remember where, so I’m just going to post my own rendition.  If you use Prosper202 or Tracking202 for your affiliate tracking software you’re well aware of the tracking string that is added to your URLS, it usually looks something like “?t202id=32254&t202kw=”.  While this part of the URL is really important since it will track everything, it is also ugly for users and can also giveaway info about your campaign to other affiliates.  There is a way to strip all this out and still have it track correctly.

What you have to do is setup a new redirect file, name it something like redirect.php or tracking.php and inside of this file put this html code:

<html>
<head></head>
<body>
<script src=”http://yourtrackingdomain/tracking202/static/landing.php?lpip=1303″ type=”text/javascript”></script>
<script type=”text/javascript”> window.location=’http://www.clean-url-users-go-to.com’;</script>
</body>
</html>

After you’ve set this file up and uploaded, you take your orginal P202 tracking string, “?t202id=32254&t202kw=” and add it to the end of this newly created redirect file to look something like http://www.yourdomain.com/redirect.php?t202id=32254&t202kw=.  Now what you’ve done is send the user to this redirect file, which contains your Prosper202 landing page javascript to track the user (which will track against the URL parameters you added), counted the user in Prosper because the javascript was triggered, then your users will be sent to a clean URL.  On this clean URL you will still use your outbound Prosper PHP redirects as normal and it will still count your click throughs.

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Protecting Against Your Prosper202/Tracking202 Server Going Down

Posted by admin | Posted in Internet, Marketing, PPC | Posted on 05-04-2009

It will inevitably happen at some point, your tracking server will go down.  It could be anything from you accidentally shutting it off, blocking traffic, data center loses power, who knows.  But the good thing is that there is a very simply trick that will save you a lot of down time.  When you setup the prosper202/tracking 202 redirects, they will look something like:

<?php

// ——————————————————————-
//
// Tracking202 PHP Redirection, created on Sun Feb, 2009
//
// This PHP code is to be used for the following landing page.
// http://youraffiliatedomain.com
//
// ——————————————————————-

if (isset($_COOKIE['tracking202outbound'])) {
$tracking202outbound = $_COOKIE['tracking202outbound'];
} else {
$tracking202outbound = ‘http://www.yourtrackingdomain.com/tracking202/redirect/lp.php?lpip=232′;
}

header(’location: ‘.$tracking202outbound);

?>

That is the standard redirect prosper will spit out to you.  It basically translates to, if the user has cookies enabled, call the tracking domain and subid from the cookie.  If they don’t have cookies enabled, here is the direct link to the tracking domain redirect.

Here is the real simple fix, instead of using your tracking domain link in the “$tracking202outbound = ” field, but in your direct affiliate link at the network of the offer.  If your tracking domain is down, PHP won’t execute the redirect from the cookie, so it will redirect to whats in the “$tracking202outbound = ” field.  You might as well put your affiliate link there anyway, because if the user doesn’t have cookies enabled, their subID won’t be tracked.

Hope this made sense, because it has saved me a lot of headache.  I edit all of my redirects to do this.

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Be More Efficient With Traffic

Posted by admin | Posted in Internet, Marketing | Posted on 23-02-2009

It has been awhile since I posted, so I thought I would post something useful.  I may not do the biggest volume on an offer, but one thing I try to pride myself on is being extremely efficient with the traffic I am getting.   There are several small tweaks and tricks I have used, some I will share, some I won’t, that help to effectively monetize my traffic better than others.  Here are a few of them.

Non-Cookied Users

Splitting out traffic for non-cookie enabled users.  I have received a couple questions from people asking me to elaborate on this so I will.  Many networks use a platform called directrack (Copeac, MarketLeverage, etc..), this platform uses cookies to track sales. If a user does not have cookies enabled, their sales will not be counted.  A competitor to Directack, a platform called Hitpath, does not use cookies to track.  Currently Eads uses this, and Ads4Dough and started the transition over to this network.  What I do is use a php script to check to see if a user has cookies enabled, then I send the traffic to my primary network of choice for that offer, if the user does not have cookies I sent the user to the offer at Eads or Ads4Dough.  I normally see about 10-15% of my leads come through as non cookied users.

Exit Pops

Exit pops are starting to become increasingly popular.  Basically, if your bounce rate is 60%, then you are not monetizing 60% of your traffic.  What many people have started to do is use javascript to pop up a window when a user tries to close the window or go back, that directs them to another page, which is usually straight to the offer.  Most people report seeing a lift of 10-20% when doing this.  I use it on some pages but not all.  One thing to remember is that many PPC platforms do not like this and can penalize pages.  I typically will not run this on a page that im running paid search.

Landing Page Margins & Font Sizes

When tweaking a landing page, one of the most important metrics is the CTR from the landing page to the offer.  You want to get it as high as possible, while still properly selling the user on the product/service.  One of the biggest ways to increase CTR is to bring the affiliate link/button above the fold for the user, usually the higher the better.  One thing I noticed when I started running blog style pages, especially with wordpress, is that many themes put most of the links below the fold for users.  Most wordpress themes lose a lot of valuable real estate to excessive margins, padding, line spacing, and font size.  When I was running blog style Acai landing pages last year, one of the biggest things that helped me was to edit my wordpress theme.  I decreased line spacing between unordered lists and header tags.  I reduced paddings and font sizes, just a little bit.  It effectively made my headers a little smaller, the pages a little wider, and most importantly, it brought my pictures and links above the fold.  I saw huge CTR jumps after implementing these changes.

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Affiliate Summit West - I’m There

Posted by admin | Posted in ASW | Posted on 08-01-2009

Well, Affiliate Summit West 2009 is just a few days, and i’m slated to fly into Vegas Saturday night.  The conference was gracious enough to give me a press pass so I will attending some of the sessions and blogging about some of what I hear.

I am really looking forward to this event for networking, trying to pick up a few tips, meet some friends, and of course go to some parties.  I’d love to meet up with people, so if you’re going hit me up on twitter or something and we can get a drink.  I’ll definitely be making my rounds, i’ll be at the network parties for advaliant, azoogle, copeac, and CX, and the WickedFire meetup on Saturday night.  So if you’re going to be there, say hey.

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